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Could Employers Be Getting It Wrong With Their Tech Teams?

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Developers Have Their Say On Flexible Working

Are employers risking losing their best talent by compromising on flexibility?

Post-pandemic working conditions are changing. Belts are tightening and many employers are requesting their workers are more present in the office.

While many companies have maintained the working structure they created during Covid-19 restrictions, do tech workers’ needs require more attention when it comes to flexibility?

Amicus conducted two surveys with over 300 software developers to find out their working from home preferences.

How much time do software developers need in the office?

We asked, ‘How often would you be willing to go into the office if your employer tightened flexible working?’

Almost fully remote working structures were preferred with 38% saying they would only be willing to work from the office 1 or 2 days a week.

Unsurprisingly, only 11% said they would go into the office 3 or 4 days a week and even less (8%) said they would go into the office 5 days a week – but only if they had to.

However, almost half of developers (43%) said they would go to the lengths of finding a new job altogether if their current employer changed their flexibility or demanded more time in the office from them.

Why do people like working from home?

Managing Consultant Jamie Crowley asked 300+ developers on LinkedIn why they like working from home. 40% said because it saves them time and money on a commute.

This is inarguably true.

On average, we spend around 45 days a year commuting to and from the office. 29% said they’re more productive from home while 23% said they love working from home because they’re able to spend more time with family and loved ones.

Comments from the remaining 7% who voted ‘Other’ delved even further into the benefits of working from home.

“Not having to put up with any office rubbish.

Things like noisy colleagues, constant distraction, below-par equipment (hardware / software / furniture), all your home comforts around you, being able to control the temperature, dropping my little boy off at school, going to his little shows every now and then etc. The list goes on and on…

…I’d say 2-3 hours at home is the same as a full day in an office, in terms of my productivity.

If my clients see tangible benefits from being fully remote, then as a contractor, I think that’s great.” Says Martin, a Contract JavaScript Developer.

Who Should Be Allowed To Work From Home?

Others noted their reasons as being able to take a lunch-time nap, being able to eat healthier, fresher food and having a peace of mind knowing their contribution to lowering emissions is increased with no commute.

More than one developer also pointed out that neurodivergent workers can sometimes find their needs overlooked and working from home provides them with a safe, comfortable environment where they’re less stimulated and, in turn, more able to work efficiently.

Our surveys reveal an interesting stance on how developers perceive their own value as employees. These findings could mean that employers might have to rethink what they ask of their employees, or risk losing out on quality team members.

Find out how you can move into a new role, or if you're looking to expand your own team, click here.
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